Untold Truth about This Old House you should know



This Old House is a home renovation media brand in the United States that includes television series, a magazine, and a website, ThisOldHouse.com. The television series, which airs on the American television network Public Broadcasting Service (PBS), covers house remodeling projects over the course of several weeks.

This Old House was one of the first national television home renovation series. As a result, it was originally controversial among construction contractors, and the cast was very much concerned that they were revealing building trade secrets. Today, in this video we are going to talk about some of the unknown facts about This Old House.

00:00​​​​​ Untold Truth about This Old House you should know
01:03 Launched with just $50,000
01:36 Thousands of houses are submitted
02:11 Vila departed in order to make more money
02:52 Skeptical of putting tradespeople on television
03:30 Enormous ratings success

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How Rich is This Old House Host Kevin O’Connor?

6 Unknown Facts about This Old House That You May Not Know

Who is This Old House star Jenn Newada?

How Rich is This Old House Plumber Richard Trethewey?

This Old House | All things you should know about the best home-improvement series

How Rich is This Old House star Tom Silva?

Audio Credit:
Track: Chocolate Cookie Jam
Artist: An Jone

Track: Communicator
Artist: Reed Mathis

Track: Denver Avenue
Artist: Reed Mathis

Track: In the Sweet By and By
Artist: Zachariah Hickman

Track: Pine Street
Artist: Reed Mathis

Source: YouTube Audio Library

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ASK This Old House | Custom Screen Door, Paint Trim (S18 E18) FULL EPISODE



Ross tests out some new smart lighting configurations; Tom helps a homeowner build a custom screen door to fit her unique front entryway; Richard gives some general advice on maintaining a washing machine; Mauro teaches a homeowner some techniques to paint old 1960s wood trim with a varnish on it.

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Ross demonstrated the Aurora Smart Bulb Dimmer, which is designed to work with Philips Hue light bulbs and is manufactured by Lutron.

To build the frame of the door, Tom used 5/4” x 8” x 8’ straight grain fir. For exterior doors, Tom finds it very important to prevent the wood from warping in any direction, which is why he recommended using a combination of a half lap and a floating tenon for the joinery. To make those cuts, he used a Domino Joiner, which is manufactured by Festool and a Jobsite Saw Pro, which is manufactured by SawStop.

To trim the door to size, Tom used a TS 55 circular saw, which is also manufactured by Festool.

The corner accent brackets and the antique hardware were either found or salvaged by the homeowner, but similar products can be found online, at hardware stores, at specialty woodworking shops, or antique sales/salvage yards. The hinges and the screen door compressor can both be bought at home centers. In this case, Tom used heavy duty screen door hardware to handle the weight of the large door, and two compressors on the top and bottom of the door to control the swing of the heavy door and to ensure it closed tightly.

The screening material they used for the door can be found at any home center. Tom recommends using clamps to slightly bow the door during the installation of the screen to ensure a tight fit. To secure the trim pieces over the screen, Tom used a 20V Max Cordless Bradnailer, which is manufactured by Dewalt.

Braided stainless steel washing machine hoses can be found at home centers.

The timed washing machine valve that only keeps pressure on the hoses for a set period of time is the Time Out Automatic Shutoff Valve, manufactured by Keeney Manufacturing Company.

The washing machine valve that only operates when it senses a current draw from the washer is the IntelliFlow, manufactured by Watts.

Both of these valves can be ordered online or from a specialty plumbing supplier.

Mauro explained that in rooms with wood trim that has a finish applied to it, it’s helpful to lightly sand the surface using 220 grit sandpaper to give the paint more to adhere to. For this project, he used a ProSand Contour Sanding Sponge, which is manufactured by Norton Abrasives.

To ensure a solid base for the paint, Mauro primed the trim with Stix Waterborne Bonding Primer, which is manufactured by INSL-X. Mauro decided to do two coats of primer in this case, since he thought it was more important to ensure a strong, even base for the paint.

The other materials Mauro used to paint the trim, including the drop cloths, brushes, painter’s tape, and buckets, can all be found at home centers and paint supply stores.

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Products and Services from this Episode
Smart Lighting
Aurora Smart Bulb Dimmer
Philips Hue light bulbs

Lumber
Baird Brothers Fine Hardwoods

Cutting tools
Domino Joiner manufactured by Festool
Jobsite Saw Pro manufactured by SawStop
TS 55 circular saw manufactured by Festool

Brad nailer
20V Max Cordless Brad nailer manufactured by Dewalt

Timed washing machine valves
Time Out Automatic Shutoff Valve manufactured by Keeney Manufacturing Company
IntelliFlow manufactured by Watts

Sanding tool
ProSand Contour Sanding Sponge manufactured by Norton Abrasives

Primer
Stix Waterborne Bonding Primer manufactured by INSL-X

About Ask This Old House TV: From the makers of This Old House, America’s first and most trusted home improvement show, Ask This Old House answers the steady stream of home improvement questions asked by viewers across the United States. Covering topics from landscaping to electrical to HVAC and plumbing to painting and more. Ask This Old House features the experts from This Old House, including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor. ASK This Old House helps you protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

Follow This Old House:
Facebook: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseFB
Twitter: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseTwitter
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ASK This Old House | Custom Screen Door, Paint Trim (S18 E18) FULL EPISODE
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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How to Build a Structural Ceiling | This Old House



Tom Silva presents a structural ceiling in the Lexington house kitchen as a solution to the height challenge.

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Tom Silva presents a solution to the ceiling height challenge in the old part of the Lexington house kitchen: a structural ceiling that will allow him to gain some height over the islands, while allowing for both adequate structure, and a clever chase for wiring.

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

About This Old House TV:
This Old House is America’s first and most trusted home improvement show. Each season, we renovate two different historic homes—one step at a time—featuring quality craftsmanship and the latest in modern technology. We demystify home improvement and provide ideas and information so, whether you are doing it yourself or hiring out contractors, you’ll know the right way to do things or the questions to ask. Our experts including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor give you the tools you need to protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

Follow This Old House:
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How to Build a Structural Ceiling | This Old House
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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How to Transplant Shade Plants | This Old House



In preparation for a massive tree take down, Roger Cook and Kevin O’Connor relocate shade plants to the side yard of the Lexington house.

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Before the trees can be removed at the Lexington house, Roger Cook shows Kevin O’Connor the valuable shade plants that could be damaged in the process, so they’re relocated to a new bed in the side yard to provide screening from the neighboring house.

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

About This Old House TV:
This Old House is America’s first and most trusted home improvement show. Each season, we renovate two different historic homes—one step at a time—featuring quality craftsmanship and the latest in modern technology. We demystify home improvement and provide ideas and information so, whether you are doing it yourself or hiring out contractors, you’ll know the right way to do things or the questions to ask. Our experts including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor give you the tools you need to protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

Follow This Old House:
Facebook: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseFB
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Pinterest: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHousePinterest
Instagram: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseIG

How to Transplant Shade Plants | This Old House
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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How to Remove Potentially Dangerous Trees | This Old House



Arborist John Marquis shows Roger Cook the proper procedures for removing 12 trees in the Lexington front yard.

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Arborist John Marquis shows Roger Cook the proper preparation, safety precautions, and procedures for doing a “take down” of the 12 trees in the Lexington front yard.

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

About This Old House TV:
This Old House is America’s first and most trusted home improvement show. Each season, we renovate two different historic homes—one step at a time—featuring quality craftsmanship and the latest in modern technology. We demystify home improvement and provide ideas and information so, whether you are doing it yourself or hiring out contractors, you’ll know the right way to do things or the questions to ask. Our experts including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor give you the tools you need to protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

Follow This Old House:
Facebook: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseFB
Twitter: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseTwitter
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How to Remove Potentially Dangerous Trees | This Old House
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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How to Reface a Concrete Wall | Ask This Old House



In this video, Mark McCullough and Jenn Nawada dress up a drab concrete wall with a stylish thin stone veneer.

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Since the wall is in good condition, veneer is a great choice to make it look much nicer at a smaller price than just replacing the whole wall. Mark and Jenn work together to prep the wall, apply the stone veneer, and lay a stone cap.

Time: 5-6 hours
Skill Level: Moderate

Tools:
Grinder [https://amzn.to/2ZtRWNg]
Brush [https://amzn.to/3saYHzG]
Trowels [https://amzn.to/3sdxRXA]
Jointer [https://amzn.to/3ugVFM8]
Mallet [https://amzn.to/3k5y9gH]
Level [https://amzn.to/3qB18et]

Shopping List:
Stone veneer [http://bit.ly/3qB1uBP]
Modified thin-set mortar [https://amzn.to/3k3P96E]

Steps:
1. Clean up the wall. Grind the top down to the raw concrete to ensure good adhesion for the cap. Repeat down the wall for both sides. Do not grind down all the way flat. The low spots will help with adhesion.
2. Spray down with water and brush clean.
3. Use a notched trowel to spread modified thin-set mortar on a small section of the wall.
4. Take a margin trowel to back-butter the stone and stick onto the wall where the mortar has been placed.
5. Use chips of stone to place in between the stones. This will prevent sagging and let the stones set the way you intended. Once the stones are set you can pull them out.
6. Use a flat jointer to add the joints.
7. Spread mortar on the top. Pitch the mortar bed slightly towards the patio or backyard, this will prevent rainwater from pooling near the stair landing below.
8. Add the stone cap.

Where to find it?
Mark and Jenn refaced the concrete using a thin stone veneer. The material is Connecticut Fieldstone and was cut in a mosaic pattern for installation. The stone cap was made of 2” thick bluestone treads. Both were sourced by Plymouth Quarries (https://www.plymouthquarries.com/index.php).

To secure the thin stone to the wall and the bluestone to the top, Mark used a modified mortar [https://amzn.to/3k3P96E]. The mortar has an adhesive in it that helps the stone to stick to the wall.

The other tools Mark and Jenn used to reface the wall, including trowels, mallets, and the level, can all be found at home centers.

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

About Ask This Old House TV:
From the makers of This Old House, America’s first and most trusted home improvement show, Ask This Old House answers the steady stream of home improvement questions asked by viewers across the United States. Covering topics from landscaping to electrical to HVAC and plumbing to painting and more. Ask This Old House features the experts from This Old House, including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor. Ask This Old House helps you protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House:
Facebook: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseFB
Twitter: http://bit.ly/AskTOHTwitter
Pinterest: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHousePinterest
Instagram: http://bit.ly/AskTOHIG

How to Reface a Concrete Wall | Ask This Old House
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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ASK This Old House | Net Zero Community, Live Edge (S16 E26) FULL EPISODE



In Austin, Ross visits a community that plans to have all net zero energy housing; Richard demonstrates the uses of less common wrenches; Tom and Kevin build a console table using a maple slab with a live edge on it.

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Ross visited Whisper Valley, a community located just outside of Austin, Texas that is currently under construction. Every home will have an array of solar panels, spray foam insulation, and geothermal heating and cooling.

Assistance with this segment was provided by Bosch and Taurus Investment Holdings.

Richard demonstrated a variety of less-common wrenches that are all designed to work with the connections around faucets and toilets. For jobs in the basement or other more complicated plumbing jobs, other tools will be required.

The basin wrenches Richard demonstrated, both the standard version and the one with the light, are available at most home centers.

The interchangeable plastic tab/brass connection basin wrench Richard talked about is the EZ Change Faucet Tool, and the other wrench Richard showed is the 2-in-1 One Stop Plumber’s Wrench. Both of these are manufactured by Ridgid.

Tom and Kevin build a console table using a maple slab with a live edge on it. Tom recommends locating a local lumber yard or mill to find live edge slabs. A quick Internet search should help you identify the one closest to you. Give them a call, talk about the project you’d like to do, and see what types of wood they have. Tom and Kevin used a slab of maple from The Rustic Wood Shop.

For a more modern look, Tom ordered hairpin metal legs to attach to the bottom of the table. He used the 48″ I-Semble Hairpin Table Legs, available at Rockler Woodworking and Hardware.

To adhere the two boards together, Tom used wood glue, manufactured by Gorilla Glue.

To finish the slab, Tom applied a coat of amber shellac and then a coat of tung oil. These are both found at home centers and woodworking shops.

All the other tools Tom and Kevin used, including the hammers, chisels, reciprocating saw, sanders and clamps, can be found at home centers and woodworking shops.

Enjoying full-episodes of This Old House? Join This Old House INSIDER to stream every episode ever made of This Old House (over 1,000 hours), commercial-free. https://bit.ly/32CLaGe

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

Products and Services from this episode

Adhesive to build a live edge slab table
Category: Materials, Design, Furnishings
Manufacturer
The Gorilla Glue Company
http://www.gorillaglue.com

EZ Change Faucet Tool & 2-in-1 One Stop Plumber’s Wrench
Category: Bathroom, Faucets & Fixtures, Kitchen, Plumbing, Tools
Manufacturer
RIDGID
http://www.ridgid.com

Maple slab to build a console table
Category: Design, Furnishings, Materials
Supplier
The Rustic Wood Shop
https://therusticwoodshop.space

Metal legs to build a live edge slab table
Category: Design, Furnishings, Materials
Manufacturer
Rockler Woodworking & Hardware
http://www.rockler.com

48” I-Semble Hairpin Table Legs

Visit to a Net Zero Neighborhood
Category: Appliances, Building Resources, HVAC, Electrical, Insulation, Side Trip
Side Trip
Whisper Valley
http://www.whispervalleyaustin.com
Expert assistance
Bosch
http://www.bosch.com
Taurus Investment Holdings
http://www.tiholdings.com

About Ask This Old House TV: From the makers of This Old House, America’s first and most trusted home improvement show, Ask This Old House answers the steady stream of home improvement questions asked by viewers across the United States. Covering topics from landscaping to electrical to HVAC and plumbing to painting and more. Ask This Old House features the experts from This Old House, including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor. ASK This Old House helps you protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

Follow This Old House:
Facebook: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseFB
Twitter: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseTwitter
Pinterest: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHousePinterest
Instagram: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseIG

ASK This Old House | Net Zero Community, Live Edge (S16 E26) FULL EPISODE
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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How to Install a Hidden Door/Bookshelf | Ask This Old House



Ask This Old House general contractor Tom Silva is in Salem, MA, to help install a bookshelf that doubles as a door. (See below for a shopping list, tools, and steps.)

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Shopping List for How to Install a Hidden Door/Bookshelf:
– Scrap piece of 1×4 poplar wood [https://amzn.to/2Fpkded]
– Murphy door [https://amzn.to/2Xs1B7s] from kit
– Shims [https://amzn.to/2J3KIqD]
– Finishing nails [https://amzn.to/2IWY8EK]

Tools for How to Install a Hidden Door/Bookshelf:
– Hammer [https://amzn.to/2Fp3xU6]
– Nailset [https://amzn.to/2Fp0NWX]
– Pry bar [https://amzn.to/2WZul84]
– Levels: 1or 2-foot and 6-foot [https://amzn.to/2Rv9Zhd]
– Scribes [https://amzn.to/2Rtv63g]
– Circular saw [https://amzn.to/2WRVh4Y]
– Wood glue [https://amzn.to/2Y4uR1g]
– Drill/driver [https://amzn.to/2JcVevV]
– Utility knife [https://amzn.to/2XpBMVx]

Steps for How to Install a Hidden Door/Bookshelf:
1. Remove current door from its hinges by popping up the pins with a hammer and nailset.
2. Remove the old jamb and casing with a pry bar.
3. To level the jamb, place a piece of poplar on the floor and make it level. Set your scribes the overall width of the filler and drag the scribes along the piece of poplar.
4. After marking the poplar, cut it with the circular saw, following the scribe line you traced.
5. Using wood glue, glue the poplar filler piece to the underside of the doorjamb to fill the gap.
6. Repeat the same steps to fill the back side of the jamb.
7. Move the jamb from the door kit into place. Using a 6-foot level, check that it’s plumb; if it needs adjusting, place shims between the jamb and the wall studs until the jamb is plumb. Drill through the jamb and shims, and secure with screws.
8. Using a utility knife and a hammer, remove the excess shims on either side.
9. Lift up the bookshelf and place in the pre-fashioned pivot-point pinholes on the top and bottom of the jamb.
10. Glue trim to the jamb and secure with finishing nails.

About Ask This Old House TV:
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we’re ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O’Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.

Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House:
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http://bit.ly/AskTOHTwitter
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Instagram: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseIG
http://bit.ly/AskTOHIG
Tumblr: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseTumblr

For more on This Old House and Ask This Old House, visit us at: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseWebsite

How to Install a Hidden Door/Bookshelf | Ask This Old House
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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How to Remove Baseboards | House One | This Old House



Need to remove your existing baseboards? Follow these steps to easily remove them without damaging your wall or flooring.

#ThisOldHouse #AskTOH SUBSCRIBE to This Old House: http://bit.ly/SubscribeThisOldHouse

Whether you’re removing baseboards to replace the flooring, paint a wall, or update the baseboards themselves, following these easy steps will save you both time and money.

Cost: $0
Time: One hour for a small room
Skill level: Easy

Materials
Scrap Block of wood [http://thd.co/3bGgzvL]

Tools
Utility Knife [https://amzn.to/3sqD3rp]
Putty knife [https://amzn.to/37N4jbI]
Hammer [https://amzn.to/2ModDez]
Pry Bar [https://amzn.to/3pURuSI]

Steps for Removing Baseboards
Step 1: Score a line along the baseboard
• Score a line along the baseboard and any quarter-round molding to help it release more easily from each other and any woodwork or drywall above.
• The joint may have been caulked or even just painted over several times. Skipping this step can pull large pieces of the paint on the adjacent surface and create the need for additional patchwork.
Step 2: Choose a starting point
• If possible, start at an outside corner where it’s easier to open the joint, versus an inside corner where the miters can lock the pieces more tightly in place. 
Step 3: Tap a putty knife behind the molding
• Using a hammer, tap the blade of a thin putty knife behind the molding, starting with any quarter-round trim installed in front of the baseboards, to start working it loose.
Step 4: Create a gap
• Once you create a gap, slide the end of a pry bar into the opening to work it free, sliding a block behind the bar to create a fulcrum and to prevent it from marring the wood or wall above. 
• Repeat this process to free the main baseboard molding, using a pry bar or hammer supported by a block to open the gap. 
• If your floors were installed in front of the baseboards, you may also need to pry the baseboards up slightly to get them free.
• Once you get behind a section, work your way down the board and around the room. 
Step 5: Pull out leftover nails
• Remove any leftover nails with a hammer, using a block to support near the base of the drywall.

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

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Tumblr: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseTumblr

How to Remove Baseboards | House One | This Old House
https://www.youtube.com/thisoldhouse/

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This Old House | The Net Zero Bungalow (S40 E1) | FULL EPISODE



The fortieth season begins in Newport, Rhode Island where Tommy picks up Kevin and drives him across the bridge to Jamestown to this season’s first project—a 1920’s bungalow

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Kevin is outside The Breakers in Newport, Rhode Island—a magnificent mansion once owned by the Vanderbilt family. A far cry from the Newport mansions, our modest Jamestown home will become a larger net zero house. They meet the owner, Donald Powers, who is also the architect, and he discusses the challenge of making a completely net zero house out of an old house with a new addition. Inside, Kevin meets Dana Powers and their two sons Nate and Theo. Dana takes Kevin on a tour of the house and describes the changes that will be made. In the basement, Richard talks to Kevin about what exists now but also what has to happen to make the house more energy efficient. The two of them visit a completed net zero home outside of Boston to see that this type of a house can still have an architecturally pleasing style. Back in Rhode Island, home builder Jeff Sweenor is introduced. He gives Kevin a tour of the latest Idea House, which is just underway. At the project house, Jeff and the team meet up with the family and demo begins.

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This Old House | The Net Zero Bungalow (S40 E1) | FULL EPISODE
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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