How to Reface a Concrete Wall | Ask This Old House



In this video, Mark McCullough and Jenn Nawada dress up a drab concrete wall with a stylish thin stone veneer.

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Since the wall is in good condition, veneer is a great choice to make it look much nicer at a smaller price than just replacing the whole wall. Mark and Jenn work together to prep the wall, apply the stone veneer, and lay a stone cap.

Time: 5-6 hours
Skill Level: Moderate

Tools:
Grinder [https://amzn.to/2ZtRWNg]
Brush [https://amzn.to/3saYHzG]
Trowels [https://amzn.to/3sdxRXA]
Jointer [https://amzn.to/3ugVFM8]
Mallet [https://amzn.to/3k5y9gH]
Level [https://amzn.to/3qB18et]

Shopping List:
Stone veneer [http://bit.ly/3qB1uBP]
Modified thin-set mortar [https://amzn.to/3k3P96E]

Steps:
1. Clean up the wall. Grind the top down to the raw concrete to ensure good adhesion for the cap. Repeat down the wall for both sides. Do not grind down all the way flat. The low spots will help with adhesion.
2. Spray down with water and brush clean.
3. Use a notched trowel to spread modified thin-set mortar on a small section of the wall.
4. Take a margin trowel to back-butter the stone and stick onto the wall where the mortar has been placed.
5. Use chips of stone to place in between the stones. This will prevent sagging and let the stones set the way you intended. Once the stones are set you can pull them out.
6. Use a flat jointer to add the joints.
7. Spread mortar on the top. Pitch the mortar bed slightly towards the patio or backyard, this will prevent rainwater from pooling near the stair landing below.
8. Add the stone cap.

Where to find it?
Mark and Jenn refaced the concrete using a thin stone veneer. The material is Connecticut Fieldstone and was cut in a mosaic pattern for installation. The stone cap was made of 2” thick bluestone treads. Both were sourced by Plymouth Quarries (https://www.plymouthquarries.com/index.php).

To secure the thin stone to the wall and the bluestone to the top, Mark used a modified mortar [https://amzn.to/3k3P96E]. The mortar has an adhesive in it that helps the stone to stick to the wall.

The other tools Mark and Jenn used to reface the wall, including trowels, mallets, and the level, can all be found at home centers.

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

About Ask This Old House TV:
From the makers of This Old House, America’s first and most trusted home improvement show, Ask This Old House answers the steady stream of home improvement questions asked by viewers across the United States. Covering topics from landscaping to electrical to HVAC and plumbing to painting and more. Ask This Old House features the experts from This Old House, including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor. Ask This Old House helps you protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

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How to Reface a Concrete Wall | Ask This Old House
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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How to Remove Baseboards | House One | This Old House



Need to remove your existing baseboards? Follow these steps to easily remove them without damaging your wall or flooring.

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Whether you’re removing baseboards to replace the flooring, paint a wall, or update the baseboards themselves, following these easy steps will save you both time and money.

Cost: $0
Time: One hour for a small room
Skill level: Easy

Materials
Scrap Block of wood [http://thd.co/3bGgzvL]

Tools
Utility Knife [https://amzn.to/3sqD3rp]
Putty knife [https://amzn.to/37N4jbI]
Hammer [https://amzn.to/2ModDez]
Pry Bar [https://amzn.to/3pURuSI]

Steps for Removing Baseboards
Step 1: Score a line along the baseboard
• Score a line along the baseboard and any quarter-round molding to help it release more easily from each other and any woodwork or drywall above.
• The joint may have been caulked or even just painted over several times. Skipping this step can pull large pieces of the paint on the adjacent surface and create the need for additional patchwork.
Step 2: Choose a starting point
• If possible, start at an outside corner where it’s easier to open the joint, versus an inside corner where the miters can lock the pieces more tightly in place. 
Step 3: Tap a putty knife behind the molding
• Using a hammer, tap the blade of a thin putty knife behind the molding, starting with any quarter-round trim installed in front of the baseboards, to start working it loose.
Step 4: Create a gap
• Once you create a gap, slide the end of a pry bar into the opening to work it free, sliding a block behind the bar to create a fulcrum and to prevent it from marring the wood or wall above. 
• Repeat this process to free the main baseboard molding, using a pry bar or hammer supported by a block to open the gap. 
• If your floors were installed in front of the baseboards, you may also need to pry the baseboards up slightly to get them free.
• Once you get behind a section, work your way down the board and around the room. 
Step 5: Pull out leftover nails
• Remove any leftover nails with a hammer, using a block to support near the base of the drywall.

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How to Remove Baseboards | House One | This Old House
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How to Install a Butcher Block Countertop | Ask This Old House



In this video, carpenter, Nathan Gilbert helps a couple replace their laminate countertop with butcher block. Then, he demonstrates how to apply a mineral oil finish to it.

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What is the Best Wood to Make a Butcher Block?
Butcher block is made from slices of wood that are all glued together into thick slabs, made to withstand heavy daily use. They can be made from nearly any wood, but Nathan chose maple as this is most popular for butcher block counters because it is hard and durable.

What is the Best Finish for a Butcher Block?
Butcher block cannot be left unfinished as it will stain very easily. The only finish Nathan uses on butcher block is mineral oil, a food-safe option that is a must in the kitchen.

It will take about 2-3 layers of finish to start and after that, it needs a layer applied about once a month. Butcher block countertops will give your kitchen a unique, rustic feel while making for a budget-friendly option.

Time: 4 hours to over two days
Cost: $75 to $150 per square foot, not including delivery costs (plus $8 per square foot for professional install)
Skill Level: Moderate

Tools:
Utility knife [https://amzn.to/39rzE4R]
Prybar [https://amzn.to/2MdY1dt]
Track saw [https://amzn.to/36gBhAz]
Circular saw [https://amzn.to/39qOJDS]
Forstner bit [https://amzn.to/3qWyGDN]
Chisel [https://amzn.to/2Mcqrom]

Shopping List:
Butcher block [https://amzn.to/3tfqMYa]
Wood glue [https://amzn.to/2MvtyHU]
Joint connectors [https://amzn.to/3adgnmX]
Food grade cutting board oil [https://amzn.to/3ou5oL3]

Where to find it?
Nathan installed Unfinished Maple Butcher Block Countertop, which is manufactured by Hardwood Reflections (https://hardwoodreflections.com/). He ordered an 8’ and 4’ section.

To cut the butcher block to size, Nathan used a TS 55 circular track saw [https://amzn.to/36gBhAz], which is manufactured by Festool (www.festoolusa.com).

To secure the two sections together, Nathan used Gorilla (www.gorillatough.com) wood glue [https://amzn.to/2MvtyHU]and Zipbolt (http://zipbolt.com.au/) UT Joint Connectors [https://amzn.to/3adgnmX].

In the segment in the Barn after the project, Nathan demonstrated how to finish butcher block using Food Grade Cutting Board Oil [https://amzn.to/3ou5oL3], which is manufactured by Howard Products (https://www.howardproducts.com/).

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

About Ask This Old House TV:
From the makers of This Old House, America’s first and most trusted home improvement show, Ask This Old House answers the steady stream of home improvement questions asked by viewers across the United States. Covering topics from landscaping to electrical to HVAC and plumbing to painting and more. Ask This Old House features the experts from This Old House, including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor. Ask This Old House helps you protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

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How to Install a Butcher Block Countertop | Ask This Old House
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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How to Make a DIY Air Filter | Ask This Old House



In this video, Ross Trethewey explains how air filtration systems work and how to build a localized DIY air filter.

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Home technology expert, Ross Trethewey teaches how air filtration systems work and how to build a localized DIY air filter. Ross explains the MERV air filtration system. MERV stands for Minimal Efficiency Reporting Value, a value that measures how effectively a filter stops particulates of varying sizes from passing through and into the air system. The higher the rating, the more effective the filter is at capturing smaller particles. Ratings 1-16 are HVAC use; in general, houses usually have around a MERV 5-12 system. MERV 17-20 are HEPA filters, those are used in hospitals and laboratories. Ross clarifies that homeowners cannot just install a MERV 16 or HEPA filter into their homes. In many circumstances the HVAC systems homeowners have in place simply aren’t strong enough to handle higher rated filters, as the more filtration the air has to go through, the more resistance it has to overcome. Even if you were to get a thicker filter that increases surface area, meaning less resistance, you’ll have to check if your HVAC system has enough space to install a thicker filter. Check with an HVAC technician to check what rating your system can handle.

If you are unable to acquire a higher rated filter, Ross demonstrates how to build your own DIY air filter. By taking four MERV-13 air filters and duct taping them on all four sides of a box fan, you’ll have a localized air filter for any room you want. For about $150, you can have a little piece of mind during wildfires and other disasters that impact our air quality.

Time: 20 minutes
Cost: $150
Skill Level: Beginner

Shopping List:
20-inch box fan [https://amzn.to/39AXsCa]
Four 20x20x2 MERV-13 air filters [https://amzn.to/3qKzECS]
Duct tape [https://amzn.to/3qpWmAd]
Cardboard cutout [https://amzn.to/3spfvns]

Steps:
1. Cut out a piece of cardboard that’s the same size as the box fan to use for the back.
2. Place the cardboard on a table and take the four air filters and stack them on the edges of the cutout, with the airflow arrow pointing in (air intake side).
3. Take duct tape and secure each filter to the fan.
4. Duct tape the cardboard backing.
5. Place the fan on the other side and secure it with duct tape.
6. Remember that you’ll have to replace the filters every once in a while. For Ross’ DIY system, the filters should be replaced about every six months.

Where to find it?
Ross built the air filter using four, 20x20x2, MERV-13 air filters, which Ross got from Filterbuy (https://filterbuy.com/ ). He duct taped the filters to a cardboard box and a 20-in 3-Speed Box Fan, which is manufactured by Lasko (https://www.lasko.com/ ), though any 20” fan would work for this application.

Expert assistance with this segment was provided by Neil Comparetto.

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

About Ask This Old House TV:
From the makers of This Old House, America’s first and most trusted home improvement show, Ask This Old House answers the steady stream of home improvement questions asked by viewers across the United States. Covering topics from landscaping to electrical to HVAC and plumbing to painting and more. Ask This Old House features the experts from This Old House, including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor. Ask This Old House helps you protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

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How to Make a DIY Air Filter | Ask This Old House
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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How to Tune Up a Compound-Miter Saw | Tool Lab | This Old House



Miter saws, especially the dual-bevel slide-style ones that are common now, are complex machines that don’t stay true forever.

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We expect them to be perfect out of the box, but at the end of the day, they show up on our doorsteps after a long journey — boxes worn, dinged, and bruised. Learn how to use, tune-up, and maintain your miter saw for years to come.

See more at TOH.com [https://www.thisoldhouse.com/e/22030450]

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

Tool Lab: Tool Lab is a series that features unbiased reviews and objective tests of new and noteworthy tools. In addition to reviews and testing, we’ll also be producing user guides, buying guides, and tips and tricks for getting the most out of tools. Tool Lab is geared towards those with pro-level experience or interest—those who are new to the trades, have been working in the trades, as well as advanced DIYers who want to know what pros know and want to perform at their level. Be sure to catch new reviews and content each week on ThisOldHouse.com/Tool-Lab or on YouTube.

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How to Tune Up a Miter Saw | Tool Lab | This Old House
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How to Install Precast Concrete Steps | Ask This Old House



In this video, mason Mark McCullough helps a homeowner remove his crumbling stone steps. Then, he tours a factory to learn how precast concrete steps are made and helps install a set at the homeowner’s house.

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The front steps appear to be original to the 1940s house and they haven’t aged well. This Old House Mason Mark McCullough demolishes the original and installs a base for the new steps. Then, he takes a tour of the facility where the precast concrete steps are made.

Time: 2 days
Cost: $2,000 and up
Skill Level: Moderate to prep and Professional to make and install steps

Tools:
Jackhammer [https://amzn.to/36FAs4u]
Shovel [https://amzn.to/2MoCmzG]
Hand tamper [https://amzn.to/36EpOLm]
Wire twister [https://amzn.to/36EMzhY]
Finishing trowel [https://amzn.to/3rp1y7X]

Shopping List:
Precast concrete steps [https://amzn.to/3tqn6Tu]
4 pieces of 2×4” [http://thd.co/3pPIhMr]
Steel ties [https://amzn.to/3cHSCpZ]
Rerod [https://amzn.to/3cK7XXj]
High strength concrete mix [https://amzn.to/2MuhxTa]

Where to find it?
Mark toured the facility of and then installed precast concrete steps with a stone veneer from Shea Concrete (https://sheaconcrete.com/). Steps can be ordered to size and with a desired finish (if any), and they are delivered directly to site.

Before the steps can be delivered, the old steps needed to be removed and a new concrete base needed to be poured. The jackhammer used to remove the steps can be rented from any home center, and the other materials used for the job, including the concrete mixes, wheelbarrows, trowels, and shovels can all be found at home centers as well.

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

About Ask This Old House TV:
From the makers of This Old House, America’s first and most trusted home improvement show, Ask This Old House answers the steady stream of home improvement questions asked by viewers across the United States. Covering topics from landscaping to electrical to HVAC and plumbing to painting and more. Ask This Old House features the experts from This Old House, including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor. Ask This Old House helps you protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

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How to Install Precast Concrete Steps | Ask This Old House
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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The Best Ice Melt for Driveways | Ask This Old House



In this video, mason Mark McCullough gives a basic overview of a few different ways to de-ice walkways and driveways during the winter, and how those deicers impact different types of masonry.

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Then, mason Mark McCullough walks Kevin O’Connor through how to choose the best ice melt for your driveway and walkways. There are basically two materials to make surfaces less slippery in the winter: salt and sand.

Mark shows Kevin his third category of de-icers, a sand/salt combination. Mixes are usually a good go-to because you can minimize the amount of salt in the mix, which reduces damage to walkways and the environment, while still providing some ice melting ability and traction from the sand.

Mark explains that while you can use salt on asphalt, it is bad for concrete. Salt can corrode the integrity of the concrete overtime by exacerbating the freeze-thaw cycle, which is how potholes and cracks form.

Cost: Free – $40
Skill Level: Easy

Shopping List:
Rock salt [https://amzn.to/373bbBj]
Sand [https://amzn.to/2NgCxgc]
Rock salt / sand combination [https://amzn.to/3rFew1p]

Where to find it?
Mark discussed a few different types of driveway and walkway de-icers. Both the rock salt and the sand were generic products that can be found at any home center.

The rock salt/sand combination was a Road Runner 20lb Ice Melt Blend Bag [https://amzn.to/3rFew1p], which is manufactured by Scotwood Industries (https://scotwoodindustries.com/#).

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

About Ask This Old House TV:
From the makers of This Old House, America’s first and most trusted home improvement show, Ask This Old House answers the steady stream of home improvement questions asked by viewers across the United States. Covering topics from landscaping to electrical to HVAC and plumbing to painting and more. Ask This Old House features the experts from This Old House, including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor. Ask This Old House helps you protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

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The Best Ice Melt for Driveways | Ask This Old House
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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Modern Platform Bench | Build It | Ask This Old House



In this video, Tom Silva and Kevin O’Connor use strips of hardwood decking to create a slatted bench inspired by an iconic mid-century furniture design.

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Given the popularity of mid-century modern furniture, Tom Silva sensed a great Build It opportunity when his son showed him a reissue of the George Nelson platform bench. Tom saw that the clean lines of the elegant 1946 design were achieved with straightforward woodworking techniques: the bench top’s half-lapped strips would be easy work for a table saw and router. The legs’ trapezoidal shape might pose more of a challenge, but loose-tenon joinery could take care of that.

Instead of the birch used in the original, Tom chose to make the bench out of ipe decking, a dense hardwood that’s prized for its rich hue, knot-free surface, and durability. Its sawdust can irritate nasal passages, so he and Kevin O’Connor hooked up their tools to vacuums when sanding and cutting it.

It took them 4 hours to assemble this bench, with $100 in materials. Not a bad investment for a reproduction piece that normally retails for around $1,000 [http://bit.ly/3q8TCYj].

Time: 4-5 hours
Cost: $40—$100
Skill Level: Hard

Tools:
Table saw [https://amzn.to/3d0YkDq]
Miter saw [https://amzn.to/3d1HC74]
Random-orbit sander [https://amzn.to/36WBIAn]
Domino joiner [https://amzn.to/3d1HUea]
Bar clamps [https://amzn.to/3aSGj7N]Bench chisel [https://amzn.to/3tMColp]
3-hp plunge router [https://amzn.to/3aWFsCW]½-inch up-cut router bit [https://amzn.to/2MKJiax]
Rubber mallet [https://amzn.to/3jO39Sh] or hammer [https://amzn.to/3a7xqbi]
Large rafter square [https://amzn.to/3d1HswG]
Drill/driver [https://amzn.to/3jAE8d3]#8 countersink bit [https://amzn.to/3jA6wMt]
Track saw [https://amzn.to/3tIWvkx] or Japanese flush-cut handsaw [https://amzn.to/3aRrtOR]

Shopping List:
1×3 ipe decking (about 40 linear feet) [http://bit.ly/2NctMUw]
100- and 180-grit sandpaper [https://amzn.to/3dd30GL]
4×20 mm Domino tenons [https://amzn.to/3tNdCle]
Wood glue [https://amzn.to/2MS4GdO]
1¼-inch #8 Torx-head deck screws [https://amzn.to/2Z1ZgPZ]

Where to find it?
Tom and Kevin built the bench out of ipe deck boards, which can be found at any home center. Tom liked the idea of ipe for the bench so it could be used for either an indoor or outdoor application.

To cut all the boards to the proper dimensions and assemble the bench, Tom used a variety of tools, including a Domino Joiner, a Kapex KS120 sliding compound miter saw, a TS 55 circular saw, which are all manufactured by Festool (www.festoolusa.com), and an Industrial Table Saw from SawStop (https://www.sawstop.com/).

Tom and Kevin secured everything together using GRK #8 1-1/2” multi-purpose screws from GRK Fasteners (https://www.grkfasteners.com/) and some wood glue from Gorilla Glue (www.gorillatough.com).

All of the other tools and materials Tom and Kevin used to build the bench can be found at home centers.

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

Build It:
This Old House general contractor Tom Silva, This Old House host Kevin O’Connor, and special guests including Jimmy DiResta, take you through step-by-step DIY projects in this popular video series. From end-tables to cutting boards to wine racks to chicken coops and more, learn how to build from the best pros in the game. Segments include mention of all tools and materials needed to get the job done.

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Modern Platform Bench | Build It | Ask This Old House
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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How to Install a Garbage Disposal | Ask This Old House



In this video, Richard Trethewey teaches the process of installing a garbage disposal where there was not one originally.

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What Is a Garbage Disposal For?
Garbage disposals are helpful to have because there’s less risk of plumbing drain damage from food going down the pipes, less trash being generated from food waste, and there is reduced kitchen odor from rotting food.

Steps for Installing a Garbage Disposal
People might want to try to install one themselves, so it’s important to understand the basics involved with the installation, particularly the parts and pieces that are needed.
It’s very easy to get confused in the plumbing aisle, so Richard breaks down the various PVC piping and fittings that can be found. These are the steps for how to install a garbage disposal.

Time: 3 hours
Cost: $100—$400
Skill Level: Moderate

Tools:
Wrenches [https://amzn.to/3qAoKQs]
Screwdriver [https://amzn.to/3safDXb]
Saw [https://amzn.to/3k3kV3M]

Shopping List:
Garbage disposal [https://amzn.to/3py4QnY]
PVC piping [https://amzn.to/3k5uS0T]
Fittings [https://amzn.to/3awtPno]
Plumber’s putty [https://amzn.to/37sNDWE]
Cleaner [https://amzn.to/3qwcxfH]
Glue [https://amzn.to/3dxlMIO]

Steps:
1. Disconnect the P-trap from the drain tail pipe with a wrench.
2. Cut the P-trap near where it exits the cabinet, which is most likely from the side or the back of the cabinet, with a mini hacksaw. Keep a bucket underneath the P-trap for any waste or sludge that might have built up in the pipes.
3. Disconnect the sink stopper and the tail pipe from the sink, which can be done from underneath with a wrench.
4. Clean the old putty on the top of the sink.
5. Apply plumber’s putty to the bottom of the new sink flange and place it in the drain hole.
6. From underneath, secure the sink flange to the counter. Older models will use three screws that can be tightened with a screwdriver, and many models now use a plastic, hand-tightened ring.
7. If the dishwasher hose needs to drain into the garbage disposal, most models come with a knockout hole that you can punch through to run the hose.
8. Attach the disposal to the mounting ring that’s attached to the sink flange. It usually can twist right on and be hand tightened.
9. Next, connect the P-trap. The hole for the drain line is usually on the side of the disposal, so new drain pipes will need to be run and connected.
10. Seal all the connections for the new P-trap, depending on what type of piping is chosen.
11. Open the faucet and check for any leaks.
12. Plug the disposer into the outlet or call an electrician to wire the disposal to power.

Where to find it?
Richard installed a Badger 100 ⅓ Continuous Feed Garbage Disposal [https://amzn.to/3py4QnY], which is manufactured by InSinkErator (https://insinkerator.emerson.com/en-us ).

The other tools and materials he used to install the disposal, including the plumber’s putty, array of PVC piping, fittings, cleaner, and glue, and wrenches can all be found at home centers and plumbing supply houses.

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

About Ask This Old House TV:
From the makers of This Old House, America’s first and most trusted home improvement show, Ask This Old House answers the steady stream of home improvement questions asked by viewers across the United States. Covering topics from landscaping to electrical to HVAC and plumbing to painting and more. Ask This Old House features the experts from This Old House, including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor. Ask This Old House helps you protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

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How to Install a Garbage Disposal | Ask This Old House
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How to Install a Wall-Mounted Mini-Split | Ask This Old House



In this video, plumbing and heating expert, Richard Trethewey explains the purpose of a mini split ductless air conditioner and the process of getting one installed.

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How Does a Mini Split Work?
It’s simple physics—heat will always transfer to cold. Using something called an inverter, the mini split is capable of capturing heat through a cold line of refrigerant and moving it to the desired location.

In the summer, the heat is extracted from the air in the house and dumped outside, making it cold. In the winter, heat is scavenged from the outside and pushed back into the house. This creates heating and cooling year-round.

Because there are no ducts to retrofit, the system is simple for a pro to install. And it provides excellent dehumidification, quiet operation, and great efficiency. Need to adjust the temperature or turn the unit off? Just use the remote control.

How Much Space Can a Mini Split Cool?
A single air handler can heat or cool up to 1,000 square feet, depending on the climate and system size. (In heating mode, it functions down to minus 13 degrees F, not a problem where you live.)

For larger spaces, up to four independently controlled indoor units can connect to one condenser, for the ultimate in zoned comfort.

Time: 4-6 hours
Cost: $2,000 – $15,000
Skill Level: Professional

Where to find it?
Richard installed a 12,000 BTU SEER Ductless Mini Split Heat Pump System [https://amzn.to/2NzrgYz], which is manufactured by LG (https://lghvac.com/home).

Installing a mini split is an involved process, so Richard recruited the help of Boston Standard Plumbing for the installation (https://www.bostonstandardplumbing.com/).

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

About Ask This Old House TV:
From the makers of This Old House, America’s first and most trusted home improvement show, Ask This Old House answers the steady stream of home improvement questions asked by viewers across the United States. Covering topics from landscaping to electrical to HVAC and plumbing to painting and more. Ask This Old House features the experts from This Old House, including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor. Ask This Old House helps you protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House:
Facebook: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseFB
Twitter: http://bit.ly/AskTOHTwitter
Pinterest: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHousePinterest
Instagram: http://bit.ly/AskTOHIG

How to Install a Wall-Mounted Mini-Split | Ask This Old House
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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