How to Caulk Around a Bathtub | Ask This Old House



Ask This Old House general contractor Tom Silva demonstrates the correct materials and techniques required for re-caulking a bathtub.

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To remove any existing caulking, Tom advises to use whichever tool is the most comfortable that has a flat enough blade to get behind the caulking without scratching it. These types of scrapers and blades can be found at home centers.

For caulking around a bathtub, Tom recommends using anything that is 100% silicone. In the segment, he used 100% Silicone Sealant in White, which is manufactured by Gorilla Glue (https://amzn.to/2WhRFK5).

Cost: $50
Time: 2-3 hours
Skill Level: Beginner

Tools List for Caulking a Bathtub:
Razor blade [https://amzn.to/2WcvjJT]
Corner grooving tool [https://amzn.to/2J5KssI]
Painter’s tape [https://amzn.to/2GMJ4IS]
Caulking gun [https://amzn.to/2Y0q1l0]

Shopping List:
100% silicone caulking [https://amzn.to/2WhRFK5]
Drop cloth [https://amzn.to/2Le0Fic]
Rags [https://amzn.to/2IVcs35]
Rubbing alcohol [https://amzn.to/2PFmCoW]

Steps:
1. Start by closing the pop-up drain in the tub and covering the entire tub with a drop cloth to protect it from scratches, residue, etc.
2. Take the razor blade and carefully pry the old caulking off the tub. Keep the angle of the blade as low as possible and watch the caulking to see if it’s being cut. If any of the caulking is left over on the tub, the new caulking won’t stick.
3. Repeat this process on the other side of the caulking where it meets the tile.
4. Once the caulking has been cut, pull it away from the tub and tile. Use the razor blade as a guide wherever the caulking is still stuck.
5. Repeat this process in the corners of shower stall. A corner grooving tool might work better than the razor blade here.
6. Add some rubbing alcohol to a rag and clean off the surfaces where the old caulking used to be. Have a fan running or open the window to keep the room well ventilated while using the rubbing alcohol.
7. Add painter’s tape about _” from the corners where the caulking will go on both the wall side and the tub side.
8. Cut the tip of the caulking and place it in the gun.
9. Apply the caulking in between the painter’s tape lines. Keep the gun perpendicular to the surface being caulked and keep moving. Keep hitting the trigger as you go along to ensure a steady amount of caulking is coming out.
10. Once you reach a corner, trace back over the caulking lines with your finger.
11. Repeat this process for all the corners that need to be caulked.
12. Remove all the painter’s tape while the caulking is still wet.
13. Let the caulking dry for 30 minutes before using the shower again. After that, the caulking will need 24 hours to cure, so don’t touch the caulking until then.

About Ask This Old House TV:
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we’re ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O’Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.

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How to Caulk Around a Bathtub | Ask This Old House
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How to Tune Up a Compound-Miter Saw | Tool Lab | This Old House



Miter saws, especially the dual-bevel slide-style ones that are common now, are complex machines that don’t stay true forever.

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We expect them to be perfect out of the box, but at the end of the day, they show up on our doorsteps after a long journey — boxes worn, dinged, and bruised. Learn how to use, tune-up, and maintain your miter saw for years to come.

See more at TOH.com [https://www.thisoldhouse.com/e/22030450]

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Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

Tool Lab: Tool Lab is a series that features unbiased reviews and objective tests of new and noteworthy tools. In addition to reviews and testing, we’ll also be producing user guides, buying guides, and tips and tricks for getting the most out of tools. Tool Lab is geared towards those with pro-level experience or interest—those who are new to the trades, have been working in the trades, as well as advanced DIYers who want to know what pros know and want to perform at their level. Be sure to catch new reviews and content each week on ThisOldHouse.com/Tool-Lab or on YouTube.

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How to Tune Up a Miter Saw | Tool Lab | This Old House
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How to Install Precast Concrete Steps | Ask This Old House



In this video, mason Mark McCullough helps a homeowner remove his crumbling stone steps. Then, he tours a factory to learn how precast concrete steps are made and helps install a set at the homeowner’s house.

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The front steps appear to be original to the 1940s house and they haven’t aged well. This Old House Mason Mark McCullough demolishes the original and installs a base for the new steps. Then, he takes a tour of the facility where the precast concrete steps are made.

Time: 2 days
Cost: $2,000 and up
Skill Level: Moderate to prep and Professional to make and install steps

Tools:
Jackhammer [https://amzn.to/36FAs4u]
Shovel [https://amzn.to/2MoCmzG]
Hand tamper [https://amzn.to/36EpOLm]
Wire twister [https://amzn.to/36EMzhY]
Finishing trowel [https://amzn.to/3rp1y7X]

Shopping List:
Precast concrete steps [https://amzn.to/3tqn6Tu]
4 pieces of 2×4” [http://thd.co/3pPIhMr]
Steel ties [https://amzn.to/3cHSCpZ]
Rerod [https://amzn.to/3cK7XXj]
High strength concrete mix [https://amzn.to/2MuhxTa]

Where to find it?
Mark toured the facility of and then installed precast concrete steps with a stone veneer from Shea Concrete (https://sheaconcrete.com/). Steps can be ordered to size and with a desired finish (if any), and they are delivered directly to site.

Before the steps can be delivered, the old steps needed to be removed and a new concrete base needed to be poured. The jackhammer used to remove the steps can be rented from any home center, and the other materials used for the job, including the concrete mixes, wheelbarrows, trowels, and shovels can all be found at home centers as well.

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

About Ask This Old House TV:
From the makers of This Old House, America’s first and most trusted home improvement show, Ask This Old House answers the steady stream of home improvement questions asked by viewers across the United States. Covering topics from landscaping to electrical to HVAC and plumbing to painting and more. Ask This Old House features the experts from This Old House, including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor. Ask This Old House helps you protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House:
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How to Install Precast Concrete Steps | Ask This Old House
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How to Duct and Zone an HVAC System | This Old House



Kevin O’Connor meets Richard Trethewey in the Belmont Victorian basement to discuss the HVAC plan.

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Kevin O’Connor meets Richard Trethewey in the Belmont Victorian basement and learns about the plan to keep the existing boiler but add air handlers and a condenser for air conditioning.

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

About This Old House TV:
his Old House is America’s first and most trusted home improvement show. Each season, we renovate two different historic homes—one step at a time—featuring quality craftsmanship and the latest in modern technology. We demystify home improvement and provide ideas and information so, whether you are doing it yourself or hiring out contractors, you’ll know the right way to do things or the questions to ask. Our experts including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor give you the tools you need to protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

Follow This Old House:
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How to Duct and Zone an HVAC System | This Old House
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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How a Ready Mix Concrete Truck Works | This Old House



Tom Silva pours a concrete “rat slab” for the new Belmont Victorian mudroom.

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Kevin O’Connor finds Tom Silva pouring a concrete “rat slab,” which will protect the Belmont Victorian mudroom against moisture and critters.

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

About This Old House TV:
This Old House is America’s first and most trusted home improvement show. Each season, we renovate two different historic homes—one step at a time—featuring quality craftsmanship and the latest in modern technology. We demystify home improvement and provide ideas and information so, whether you are doing it yourself or hiring out contractors, you’ll know the right way to do things or the questions to ask. Our experts including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor give you the tools you need to protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

Follow This Old House:
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How a Ready Mix Concrete Truck Works | This Old House
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This Old House | Brick and Mortar (S39 E19) | FULL EPISODE



An old fireplace will house a new stove. Tommy discusses using interior casework with exposed brick. The kitchen house brick needs repointing. Roger tours hidden gardens. Across town, demo continues while Tommy and Judith look at flooring options.

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Kevin finds builder Mark in the old dining room, which will become a new kitchen.

To accommodate the desired cabinet layout, the homeowners have decided their new range should slide into the space currently used as a fireplace. Mark shows Kevin what needs to be done to the fireplace in order to create the space.

With the plan to expose the brick on many of the walls in the house, Mark needs to decide how to handle the original casework around all the windows. He and Tommy discuss the options, and he shows homeowner Scott a mockup of what he thinks will look best for the house.

The brick and mortar in the single house date to the 1840’s. As they restore the kitchen house, they need to repoint the exposed brick. Master mason Mark McCullough has come to Charleston to inspect the old mortar and to check out how they update it down south.

Roger takes a tour of some hidden gardens with the Edwards’ landscape architect, Glen Gardner, starting with another Charleston Single House.

Work is just getting underway at the other project across town. Tommy checks in with a demo expert to see what they are discovering. Many joists and floorboards are rotted.

Judith plans on wood flooring throughout the house. Tommy takes her to a local showroom to discuss what she should consider when making selections.

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

Products and Services from this episode

Demolition Crew
Category: Contractors & Services, Building Resources
Contractor
Evans Group Demolition
843.324.2047

Flooring shop
Category: Design, Flooring
Side Trip
Reclaimed Designworks
https://www.reclaimeddesignworks.com

General Contractor – Single House
Category: Contractors & Services
Contractor
Renew Urban
http://www.renewurban.net/

Mortar analysis and production
Category: Masonry, Contractors & Services, Building Resources
Side Trip
LafargeHolcim
https://www.lafargeholcim.com

Roof Demolition
Category: Contractors & Services, Building Resources
Contractor
Strymline Solutions
https://www.facebook.com/Strymlinesolutions/

Visit to historic garden
Category: Landscaping, Design, Contractors & Services
Side Trip
Heyward-Washingon House
https://www.charlestonmuseum.org/historic-houses/heyward-washington-house/
Expert assistance
Glen Gardner
https://www.gardnerla.com
Enjoying full-episodes of This Old House? Join This Old House INSIDER to stream every episode ever made of This Old House (over 1,000 hours), commercial-free. https://bit.ly/32CLaGe

About This Old House TV: This Old House is America’s first and most trusted home improvement show. Each season, we renovate two different historic homes—one step at a time—featuring quality craftsmanship and the latest in modern technology. We demystify home improvement and provide ideas and information so, whether you are doing it yourself or hiring out contractors, you’ll know the right way to do things or the questions to ask. Our experts including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor give you the tools you need to protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

Follow This Old House:
Facebook: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseFB
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Pinterest: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHousePinterest
Instagram: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseIG

This Old House | Brick and Mortar (S39 E19) | FULL EPISODE
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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The Best Ice Melt for Driveways | Ask This Old House



In this video, mason Mark McCullough gives a basic overview of a few different ways to de-ice walkways and driveways during the winter, and how those deicers impact different types of masonry.

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Then, mason Mark McCullough walks Kevin O’Connor through how to choose the best ice melt for your driveway and walkways. There are basically two materials to make surfaces less slippery in the winter: salt and sand.

Mark shows Kevin his third category of de-icers, a sand/salt combination. Mixes are usually a good go-to because you can minimize the amount of salt in the mix, which reduces damage to walkways and the environment, while still providing some ice melting ability and traction from the sand.

Mark explains that while you can use salt on asphalt, it is bad for concrete. Salt can corrode the integrity of the concrete overtime by exacerbating the freeze-thaw cycle, which is how potholes and cracks form.

Cost: Free – $40
Skill Level: Easy

Shopping List:
Rock salt [https://amzn.to/373bbBj]
Sand [https://amzn.to/2NgCxgc]
Rock salt / sand combination [https://amzn.to/3rFew1p]

Where to find it?
Mark discussed a few different types of driveway and walkway de-icers. Both the rock salt and the sand were generic products that can be found at any home center.

The rock salt/sand combination was a Road Runner 20lb Ice Melt Blend Bag [https://amzn.to/3rFew1p], which is manufactured by Scotwood Industries (https://scotwoodindustries.com/#).

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

About Ask This Old House TV:
From the makers of This Old House, America’s first and most trusted home improvement show, Ask This Old House answers the steady stream of home improvement questions asked by viewers across the United States. Covering topics from landscaping to electrical to HVAC and plumbing to painting and more. Ask This Old House features the experts from This Old House, including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor. Ask This Old House helps you protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House:
Facebook: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseFB
Twitter: http://bit.ly/AskTOHTwitter
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Instagram: http://bit.ly/AskTOHIG

The Best Ice Melt for Driveways | Ask This Old House
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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ASK This Old House | Drafty Door, Clean Paintbrushes (S16 E25) FULL EPISODE



Tom uses multiple techniques to make a drafty door weathertight; Mauro demonstrates the most effective way to clean a paintbrush; Roger and Jenn test out a variety of battery-operated lawn tools.

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To fix the door, Tom addressed multiple issues: the door was out of plumb, it was too short, and it was drafty.

To make the door plumb, Tom used a plumb bob, a chalk line, a chisel, and a shoulder plane. These can be found at home centers. It’s also possible to use power tools to shave back the jamb, but hand tools will be required at the top and bottom of the door where those tools wouldn’t fit.

The tools Tom used to lengthen the door, including the wood, clamps, wood glue, and hammer, can be found at home centers.

Tom also improved the weather stripping to make the door more weathertight. The automatic door bottom, the corner-groove weather stripping, and the corner-grooving tool and associated bits are all manufactured by Conservation Technology.

How to Clean Paintbrushes Like a Pro

Mauro suggests that the best way to clean a paintbrush is to be as gentle as possible. He recommends using warm water, a little bit of soap, and your fingers to try to clean the paintbrush.

If that does not work, a scrub pad can be used to gently brush off residue. Mauro used Scotch-Brite Heavy Duty Scouring Pads, manufactured by 3M. These can be found at home centers, department stores, and grocery stores.

Testing Battery Powered Yard Tools

Roger and Jenn determined that battery-powered tools work well for small- to medium-sized yards. While these tools were effective compared to gas tools, one setback they noticed is that batteries are not interchangeable across different brands of tools, and most companies do not make full lines of battery-powered yard tools. This means that multiple batteries are required in order to make the full switch from gas to battery.

Roger and Jenn saw a variety of tools manufactured by Husqvarna, Oregon, and Greenworks.

The battery-powered, ride-on lawnmower is manufactured by Ryobi.

Enjoying full-episodes of This Old House? Join This Old House INSIDER to stream every episode ever made of This Old House (over 1,000 hours), commercial-free. https://bit.ly/32CLaGe

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

Products and Services from this episode

Battery-powered ride-on lawnmower
Category: Landscaping, Tools
Manufacturer
Ryobi
http://www.ryobitools.com

Battery-powered yard tool examples
Category: Landscaping, Tools
Manufacturer
Greenworks
https://www.greenworkstools.com
Husqvarna
http://www.usa.husqvarna.com
Oregon
http://www.oregonproducts.com/

Scrub pad to clean residue off paintbrushes
Category: Paints & Finishes, Tools
Manufacturer
3M
http://www.3m.com

Weather stripping and tools to fit an antique door
Category: Insulation, Materials, Tools, Doors & Hardware
Manufacturer
Conservation Technology
http://www.conservationtechnology.com/building_weatherseals_cornergroove.html

About Ask This Old House TV: From the makers of This Old House, America’s first and most trusted home improvement show, Ask This Old House answers the steady stream of home improvement questions asked by viewers across the United States. Covering topics from landscaping to electrical to HVAC and plumbing to painting and more. Ask This Old House features the experts from This Old House, including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor. ASK This Old House helps you protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

Follow This Old House:
Facebook: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseFB
Twitter: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseTwitter
Pinterest: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHousePinterest
Instagram: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseIG

ASK This Old House | Drafty Door, Clean Paintbrushes (S16 E25) FULL EPISODE
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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This Old House | Construction Gets a Jumpstart (S39 E4) | FULL EPISODE



Kevin and Tom build a new subfloor. Richard hunts for an old clawfoot tub. Tom demonstrates how to check porch level and build a hip roof. Kevin learns about a job training program in Baltimore.

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Kevin arrives to find Tommy working on fixing the old addition subfloor. When he first toured the house, Tommy noticed a 3/4-inch elevation change between the dining room and the family room. They also need to restructure the corner of the floor where the new wood-burning stove will go.

Meanwhile, Richard travels to an architectural salvage yard in New Hampshire to meet the homeowners and their designer, Chloe Rideout, as they shop for the right tub. Liz and Joe want a very traditional look for their new master bath. Chloe thinks an antique claw-foot tub should be the focal point.

Back in Newton, the front porch can use a lot of love. Tommy shows the apprentices how far out of level it is, and he’s coming up with a plan to fix it.

Kevin travels to the rough neighborhoods of Baltimore to find a Generation NEXT success story. It’s called Project JumpStart, and it helps turn recovering drug addicts and nonviolent offenders into job candidates for the construction trades.

Back at the project house, the architect has drawn a hip roof over the new garage. Tommy teaches the apprentices how to calculate the cuts needed to make the rafters.

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This Old House | Construction Gets a Jumpstart (S39 E4) | FULL EPISODEhttps://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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Modern Platform Bench | Build It | Ask This Old House



In this video, Tom Silva and Kevin O’Connor use strips of hardwood decking to create a slatted bench inspired by an iconic mid-century furniture design.

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Given the popularity of mid-century modern furniture, Tom Silva sensed a great Build It opportunity when his son showed him a reissue of the George Nelson platform bench. Tom saw that the clean lines of the elegant 1946 design were achieved with straightforward woodworking techniques: the bench top’s half-lapped strips would be easy work for a table saw and router. The legs’ trapezoidal shape might pose more of a challenge, but loose-tenon joinery could take care of that.

Instead of the birch used in the original, Tom chose to make the bench out of ipe decking, a dense hardwood that’s prized for its rich hue, knot-free surface, and durability. Its sawdust can irritate nasal passages, so he and Kevin O’Connor hooked up their tools to vacuums when sanding and cutting it.

It took them 4 hours to assemble this bench, with $100 in materials. Not a bad investment for a reproduction piece that normally retails for around $1,000 [http://bit.ly/3q8TCYj].

Time: 4-5 hours
Cost: $40—$100
Skill Level: Hard

Tools:
Table saw [https://amzn.to/3d0YkDq]
Miter saw [https://amzn.to/3d1HC74]
Random-orbit sander [https://amzn.to/36WBIAn]
Domino joiner [https://amzn.to/3d1HUea]
Bar clamps [https://amzn.to/3aSGj7N]Bench chisel [https://amzn.to/3tMColp]
3-hp plunge router [https://amzn.to/3aWFsCW]½-inch up-cut router bit [https://amzn.to/2MKJiax]
Rubber mallet [https://amzn.to/3jO39Sh] or hammer [https://amzn.to/3a7xqbi]
Large rafter square [https://amzn.to/3d1HswG]
Drill/driver [https://amzn.to/3jAE8d3]#8 countersink bit [https://amzn.to/3jA6wMt]
Track saw [https://amzn.to/3tIWvkx] or Japanese flush-cut handsaw [https://amzn.to/3aRrtOR]

Shopping List:
1×3 ipe decking (about 40 linear feet) [http://bit.ly/2NctMUw]
100- and 180-grit sandpaper [https://amzn.to/3dd30GL]
4×20 mm Domino tenons [https://amzn.to/3tNdCle]
Wood glue [https://amzn.to/2MS4GdO]
1¼-inch #8 Torx-head deck screws [https://amzn.to/2Z1ZgPZ]

Where to find it?
Tom and Kevin built the bench out of ipe deck boards, which can be found at any home center. Tom liked the idea of ipe for the bench so it could be used for either an indoor or outdoor application.

To cut all the boards to the proper dimensions and assemble the bench, Tom used a variety of tools, including a Domino Joiner, a Kapex KS120 sliding compound miter saw, a TS 55 circular saw, which are all manufactured by Festool (www.festoolusa.com), and an Industrial Table Saw from SawStop (https://www.sawstop.com/).

Tom and Kevin secured everything together using GRK #8 1-1/2” multi-purpose screws from GRK Fasteners (https://www.grkfasteners.com/) and some wood glue from Gorilla Glue (www.gorillatough.com).

All of the other tools and materials Tom and Kevin used to build the bench can be found at home centers.

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House Insider to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

Plus, download our FREE app for full-episode streaming to your connected TV, phone or tablet: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/pages/streaming-app

Build It:
This Old House general contractor Tom Silva, This Old House host Kevin O’Connor, and special guests including Jimmy DiResta, take you through step-by-step DIY projects in this popular video series. From end-tables to cutting boards to wine racks to chicken coops and more, learn how to build from the best pros in the game. Segments include mention of all tools and materials needed to get the job done.

Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House:
Facebook: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseFB
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Instagram: http://bit.ly/AskTOHIG

Modern Platform Bench | Build It | Ask This Old House
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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