ASK This Old House | Custom Screen Door, Paint Trim (S18 E18) FULL EPISODE



Ross tests out some new smart lighting configurations; Tom helps a homeowner build a custom screen door to fit her unique front entryway; Richard gives some general advice on maintaining a washing machine; Mauro teaches a homeowner some techniques to paint old 1960s wood trim with a varnish on it.

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Ross demonstrated the Aurora Smart Bulb Dimmer, which is designed to work with Philips Hue light bulbs and is manufactured by Lutron.

To build the frame of the door, Tom used 5/4” x 8” x 8’ straight grain fir. For exterior doors, Tom finds it very important to prevent the wood from warping in any direction, which is why he recommended using a combination of a half lap and a floating tenon for the joinery. To make those cuts, he used a Domino Joiner, which is manufactured by Festool and a Jobsite Saw Pro, which is manufactured by SawStop.

To trim the door to size, Tom used a TS 55 circular saw, which is also manufactured by Festool.

The corner accent brackets and the antique hardware were either found or salvaged by the homeowner, but similar products can be found online, at hardware stores, at specialty woodworking shops, or antique sales/salvage yards. The hinges and the screen door compressor can both be bought at home centers. In this case, Tom used heavy duty screen door hardware to handle the weight of the large door, and two compressors on the top and bottom of the door to control the swing of the heavy door and to ensure it closed tightly.

The screening material they used for the door can be found at any home center. Tom recommends using clamps to slightly bow the door during the installation of the screen to ensure a tight fit. To secure the trim pieces over the screen, Tom used a 20V Max Cordless Bradnailer, which is manufactured by Dewalt.

Braided stainless steel washing machine hoses can be found at home centers.

The timed washing machine valve that only keeps pressure on the hoses for a set period of time is the Time Out Automatic Shutoff Valve, manufactured by Keeney Manufacturing Company.

The washing machine valve that only operates when it senses a current draw from the washer is the IntelliFlow, manufactured by Watts.

Both of these valves can be ordered online or from a specialty plumbing supplier.

Mauro explained that in rooms with wood trim that has a finish applied to it, it’s helpful to lightly sand the surface using 220 grit sandpaper to give the paint more to adhere to. For this project, he used a ProSand Contour Sanding Sponge, which is manufactured by Norton Abrasives.

To ensure a solid base for the paint, Mauro primed the trim with Stix Waterborne Bonding Primer, which is manufactured by INSL-X. Mauro decided to do two coats of primer in this case, since he thought it was more important to ensure a strong, even base for the paint.

The other materials Mauro used to paint the trim, including the drop cloths, brushes, painter’s tape, and buckets, can all be found at home centers and paint supply stores.

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Products and Services from this Episode
Smart Lighting
Aurora Smart Bulb Dimmer
Philips Hue light bulbs

Lumber
Baird Brothers Fine Hardwoods

Cutting tools
Domino Joiner manufactured by Festool
Jobsite Saw Pro manufactured by SawStop
TS 55 circular saw manufactured by Festool

Brad nailer
20V Max Cordless Brad nailer manufactured by Dewalt

Timed washing machine valves
Time Out Automatic Shutoff Valve manufactured by Keeney Manufacturing Company
IntelliFlow manufactured by Watts

Sanding tool
ProSand Contour Sanding Sponge manufactured by Norton Abrasives

Primer
Stix Waterborne Bonding Primer manufactured by INSL-X

About Ask This Old House TV: From the makers of This Old House, America’s first and most trusted home improvement show, Ask This Old House answers the steady stream of home improvement questions asked by viewers across the United States. Covering topics from landscaping to electrical to HVAC and plumbing to painting and more. Ask This Old House features the experts from This Old House, including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor. ASK This Old House helps you protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

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How to Build a Structural Ceiling | This Old House



Tom Silva presents a structural ceiling in the Lexington house kitchen as a solution to the height challenge.

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Tom Silva presents a solution to the ceiling height challenge in the old part of the Lexington house kitchen: a structural ceiling that will allow him to gain some height over the islands, while allowing for both adequate structure, and a clever chase for wiring.

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About This Old House TV:
This Old House is America’s first and most trusted home improvement show. Each season, we renovate two different historic homes—one step at a time—featuring quality craftsmanship and the latest in modern technology. We demystify home improvement and provide ideas and information so, whether you are doing it yourself or hiring out contractors, you’ll know the right way to do things or the questions to ask. Our experts including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor give you the tools you need to protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

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How to Install a Hidden Door/Bookshelf | Ask This Old House



Ask This Old House general contractor Tom Silva is in Salem, MA, to help install a bookshelf that doubles as a door. (See below for a shopping list, tools, and steps.)

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Shopping List for How to Install a Hidden Door/Bookshelf:
– Scrap piece of 1×4 poplar wood [https://amzn.to/2Fpkded]
– Murphy door [https://amzn.to/2Xs1B7s] from kit
– Shims [https://amzn.to/2J3KIqD]
– Finishing nails [https://amzn.to/2IWY8EK]

Tools for How to Install a Hidden Door/Bookshelf:
– Hammer [https://amzn.to/2Fp3xU6]
– Nailset [https://amzn.to/2Fp0NWX]
– Pry bar [https://amzn.to/2WZul84]
– Levels: 1or 2-foot and 6-foot [https://amzn.to/2Rv9Zhd]
– Scribes [https://amzn.to/2Rtv63g]
– Circular saw [https://amzn.to/2WRVh4Y]
– Wood glue [https://amzn.to/2Y4uR1g]
– Drill/driver [https://amzn.to/2JcVevV]
– Utility knife [https://amzn.to/2XpBMVx]

Steps for How to Install a Hidden Door/Bookshelf:
1. Remove current door from its hinges by popping up the pins with a hammer and nailset.
2. Remove the old jamb and casing with a pry bar.
3. To level the jamb, place a piece of poplar on the floor and make it level. Set your scribes the overall width of the filler and drag the scribes along the piece of poplar.
4. After marking the poplar, cut it with the circular saw, following the scribe line you traced.
5. Using wood glue, glue the poplar filler piece to the underside of the doorjamb to fill the gap.
6. Repeat the same steps to fill the back side of the jamb.
7. Move the jamb from the door kit into place. Using a 6-foot level, check that it’s plumb; if it needs adjusting, place shims between the jamb and the wall studs until the jamb is plumb. Drill through the jamb and shims, and secure with screws.
8. Using a utility knife and a hammer, remove the excess shims on either side.
9. Lift up the bookshelf and place in the pre-fashioned pivot-point pinholes on the top and bottom of the jamb.
10. Glue trim to the jamb and secure with finishing nails.

About Ask This Old House TV:
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we’re ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O’Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.

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Tumblr: http://bit.ly/ThisOldHouseTumblr

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How to Install a Hidden Door/Bookshelf | Ask This Old House
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This Old House | The Net Zero Bungalow (S40 E1) | FULL EPISODE



The fortieth season begins in Newport, Rhode Island where Tommy picks up Kevin and drives him across the bridge to Jamestown to this season’s first project—a 1920’s bungalow

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Kevin is outside The Breakers in Newport, Rhode Island—a magnificent mansion once owned by the Vanderbilt family. A far cry from the Newport mansions, our modest Jamestown home will become a larger net zero house. They meet the owner, Donald Powers, who is also the architect, and he discusses the challenge of making a completely net zero house out of an old house with a new addition. Inside, Kevin meets Dana Powers and their two sons Nate and Theo. Dana takes Kevin on a tour of the house and describes the changes that will be made. In the basement, Richard talks to Kevin about what exists now but also what has to happen to make the house more energy efficient. The two of them visit a completed net zero home outside of Boston to see that this type of a house can still have an architecturally pleasing style. Back in Rhode Island, home builder Jeff Sweenor is introduced. He gives Kevin a tour of the latest Idea House, which is just underway. At the project house, Jeff and the team meet up with the family and demo begins.

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This Old House | The Net Zero Bungalow (S40 E1) | FULL EPISODE
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How to Lay Subflooring | This Old House



Tom Silva and Kevin O’Connor start laying subfloor in the Cape Ann dining room.

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After several weeks of asbestos and lead removal it’s time to start rebuilding the interior of the Cape Ann project. Kevin O’Connor helps Tom Silva lay subflooring in what will become the new dining room.

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About This Old House TV:
This Old House is the No. 1 multimedia home enthusiast brand, offering trusted information and expert advice through award-winning television, a highly regarded magazine, and an information-driven website. This Old House and Ask This Old House are produced by This Old House Ventures, LLC and are presented on PBS by WETA Washington, DC.

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How to Lay Subflooring | This Old House
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How to Caulk Around a Bathtub | Ask This Old House



Ask This Old House general contractor Tom Silva demonstrates the correct materials and techniques required for re-caulking a bathtub.

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To remove any existing caulking, Tom advises to use whichever tool is the most comfortable that has a flat enough blade to get behind the caulking without scratching it. These types of scrapers and blades can be found at home centers.

For caulking around a bathtub, Tom recommends using anything that is 100% silicone. In the segment, he used 100% Silicone Sealant in White, which is manufactured by Gorilla Glue (https://amzn.to/2WhRFK5).

Cost: $50
Time: 2-3 hours
Skill Level: Beginner

Tools List for Caulking a Bathtub:
Razor blade [https://amzn.to/2WcvjJT]
Corner grooving tool [https://amzn.to/2J5KssI]
Painter’s tape [https://amzn.to/2GMJ4IS]
Caulking gun [https://amzn.to/2Y0q1l0]

Shopping List:
100% silicone caulking [https://amzn.to/2WhRFK5]
Drop cloth [https://amzn.to/2Le0Fic]
Rags [https://amzn.to/2IVcs35]
Rubbing alcohol [https://amzn.to/2PFmCoW]

Steps:
1. Start by closing the pop-up drain in the tub and covering the entire tub with a drop cloth to protect it from scratches, residue, etc.
2. Take the razor blade and carefully pry the old caulking off the tub. Keep the angle of the blade as low as possible and watch the caulking to see if it’s being cut. If any of the caulking is left over on the tub, the new caulking won’t stick.
3. Repeat this process on the other side of the caulking where it meets the tile.
4. Once the caulking has been cut, pull it away from the tub and tile. Use the razor blade as a guide wherever the caulking is still stuck.
5. Repeat this process in the corners of shower stall. A corner grooving tool might work better than the razor blade here.
6. Add some rubbing alcohol to a rag and clean off the surfaces where the old caulking used to be. Have a fan running or open the window to keep the room well ventilated while using the rubbing alcohol.
7. Add painter’s tape about _” from the corners where the caulking will go on both the wall side and the tub side.
8. Cut the tip of the caulking and place it in the gun.
9. Apply the caulking in between the painter’s tape lines. Keep the gun perpendicular to the surface being caulked and keep moving. Keep hitting the trigger as you go along to ensure a steady amount of caulking is coming out.
10. Once you reach a corner, trace back over the caulking lines with your finger.
11. Repeat this process for all the corners that need to be caulked.
12. Remove all the painter’s tape while the caulking is still wet.
13. Let the caulking dry for 30 minutes before using the shower again. After that, the caulking will need 24 hours to cure, so don’t touch the caulking until then.

About Ask This Old House TV:
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we’re ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O’Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.

Looking for more step by step guidance on how to complete projects around the house? Join This Old House INSIDER to stream over 1,000 episodes commercial-free: https://bit.ly/2GPiYbH

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https://bit.ly/34RYEP5

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http://bit.ly/AskTOHIG

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How to Caulk Around a Bathtub | Ask This Old House
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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How a Ready Mix Concrete Truck Works | This Old House



Tom Silva pours a concrete “rat slab” for the new Belmont Victorian mudroom.

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Kevin O’Connor finds Tom Silva pouring a concrete “rat slab,” which will protect the Belmont Victorian mudroom against moisture and critters.

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About This Old House TV:
This Old House is America’s first and most trusted home improvement show. Each season, we renovate two different historic homes—one step at a time—featuring quality craftsmanship and the latest in modern technology. We demystify home improvement and provide ideas and information so, whether you are doing it yourself or hiring out contractors, you’ll know the right way to do things or the questions to ask. Our experts including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor give you the tools you need to protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

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How a Ready Mix Concrete Truck Works | This Old House
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Modern Platform Bench | Build It | Ask This Old House



In this video, Tom Silva and Kevin O’Connor use strips of hardwood decking to create a slatted bench inspired by an iconic mid-century furniture design.

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Given the popularity of mid-century modern furniture, Tom Silva sensed a great Build It opportunity when his son showed him a reissue of the George Nelson platform bench. Tom saw that the clean lines of the elegant 1946 design were achieved with straightforward woodworking techniques: the bench top’s half-lapped strips would be easy work for a table saw and router. The legs’ trapezoidal shape might pose more of a challenge, but loose-tenon joinery could take care of that.

Instead of the birch used in the original, Tom chose to make the bench out of ipe decking, a dense hardwood that’s prized for its rich hue, knot-free surface, and durability. Its sawdust can irritate nasal passages, so he and Kevin O’Connor hooked up their tools to vacuums when sanding and cutting it.

It took them 4 hours to assemble this bench, with $100 in materials. Not a bad investment for a reproduction piece that normally retails for around $1,000 [http://bit.ly/3q8TCYj].

Time: 4-5 hours
Cost: $40—$100
Skill Level: Hard

Tools:
Table saw [https://amzn.to/3d0YkDq]
Miter saw [https://amzn.to/3d1HC74]
Random-orbit sander [https://amzn.to/36WBIAn]
Domino joiner [https://amzn.to/3d1HUea]
Bar clamps [https://amzn.to/3aSGj7N]Bench chisel [https://amzn.to/3tMColp]
3-hp plunge router [https://amzn.to/3aWFsCW]½-inch up-cut router bit [https://amzn.to/2MKJiax]
Rubber mallet [https://amzn.to/3jO39Sh] or hammer [https://amzn.to/3a7xqbi]
Large rafter square [https://amzn.to/3d1HswG]
Drill/driver [https://amzn.to/3jAE8d3]#8 countersink bit [https://amzn.to/3jA6wMt]
Track saw [https://amzn.to/3tIWvkx] or Japanese flush-cut handsaw [https://amzn.to/3aRrtOR]

Shopping List:
1×3 ipe decking (about 40 linear feet) [http://bit.ly/2NctMUw]
100- and 180-grit sandpaper [https://amzn.to/3dd30GL]
4×20 mm Domino tenons [https://amzn.to/3tNdCle]
Wood glue [https://amzn.to/2MS4GdO]
1¼-inch #8 Torx-head deck screws [https://amzn.to/2Z1ZgPZ]

Where to find it?
Tom and Kevin built the bench out of ipe deck boards, which can be found at any home center. Tom liked the idea of ipe for the bench so it could be used for either an indoor or outdoor application.

To cut all the boards to the proper dimensions and assemble the bench, Tom used a variety of tools, including a Domino Joiner, a Kapex KS120 sliding compound miter saw, a TS 55 circular saw, which are all manufactured by Festool (www.festoolusa.com), and an Industrial Table Saw from SawStop (https://www.sawstop.com/).

Tom and Kevin secured everything together using GRK #8 1-1/2” multi-purpose screws from GRK Fasteners (https://www.grkfasteners.com/) and some wood glue from Gorilla Glue (www.gorillatough.com).

All of the other tools and materials Tom and Kevin used to build the bench can be found at home centers.

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Build It:
This Old House general contractor Tom Silva, This Old House host Kevin O’Connor, and special guests including Jimmy DiResta, take you through step-by-step DIY projects in this popular video series. From end-tables to cutting boards to wine racks to chicken coops and more, learn how to build from the best pros in the game. Segments include mention of all tools and materials needed to get the job done.

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Modern Platform Bench | Build It | Ask This Old House
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Window Restoration from Start to Finish | This Old House



This Old House takes on restoring the old windows at the Belmont Victorian house. We show you the entire process from start to finish.

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Tom Silva and window restorer Dave Greenwood discuss the pros and cons of restoring old windows vs. buying new ones. Dave explains the restoration process and work begins to remove the windows. Then Dave Greenwood shows Norm Abram how he’s repairing the window pulley systems throughout the house. Norm pays a visit to the shop where the original windows are undergoing restoration. And finally, after Tom installs a new storm window, the original refurbished windows are installed.

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About This Old House TV:
This Old House is America’s first and most trusted home improvement show. Each season, we renovate two different historic homes—one step at a time—featuring quality craftsmanship and the latest in modern technology. We demystify home improvement and provide ideas and information so, whether you are doing it yourself or hiring out contractors, you’ll know the right way to do things or the questions to ask. Our experts including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor give you the tools you need to protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

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Window Restoration from Start to Finish | This Old House
https://www.youtube.com/user/thisoldhouse/

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1620396869 Hqdefault

First appearance of Tom Silva 1987



This Old House first appearance of general contractor Tommy Silva who is working on a nearby project. With Bob Vila. From “This Old House” Season 9 “The Westwood House ” Episode 15 “The Westwood House – 15”. Originally aired May 28th, 1987.

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TOH Clips is a fan channel only. We are not affiliated with the official This Old House brand or PBS.

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