22 Smart Painting Tips And Ideas

22 SMART PAINTING TIPS AND IDEAS



Check out these insanely creative painting tips and ideas!

They’ll come in handy whether you’re doing repair works in your house or just upgrading your inner artist’s skills or just painting for fun!

Yarn thread painting techniques, handprints in a frame, drawing with water and ink and great designer tips to liven up the walls in your apartment! 🙂

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http://www.brightside.me/ This video is made for entertainment purposes. We do not make any warranties about the completeness, safety and reliability. Any action you take upon the information on this video is strictly at your own risk, and we will not be liable for any damages or losses. It is the viewer’s responsibility to use judgment, care and precautions if one plans to replicate.

The following video might feature activity performed by our actors within controlled environment- please use judgment, care, and precaution if you plan to replicate.

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How to Install Shiplap Panelling | This Old House



Everyone is covering their walls with shiplap. It’s the hottest wall covering. The Arlington homeowners love it too and want to finish the third floor with it. Kevin O’Connor finds Tom Silva installing shiplap in the office. But Tom has a not so big secret. Shiplap has been around for a long time.

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Kevin O’Connor checks on the progress throughout the Arlington house on his way up to the third floor where Tom Silva is working on shiplap paneling. Tom shows Kevin what a true shiplap joint looks like. The boards have overlapping joints on both sides and over time a small reveal between the boards is created as they shrink. This kind of siding has been around for a long time and is seen on barns and sheds. There are other ways of creating the same shiplap look. For this project, Tom is using 1×8 stock butted up against one another. First the wall is covered with tar paper so if the boards shrink the insulation won’t show through the crack. He marks the top of the board on the tar paper on each side and snaps a chalk line. They continue cutting and nailing in the pieces all the way up the ceiling.

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About This Old House TV:
This Old House is America’s first and most trusted home improvement show. Each season, we renovate two different historic homes—one step at a time—featuring quality craftsmanship and the latest in modern technology. We demystify home improvement and provide ideas and information so, whether you are doing it yourself or hiring out contractors, you’ll know the right way to do things or the questions to ask. Our experts including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor give you the tools you need to protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

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How to Install Shiplap Panelling | This Old House
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How to Identify and Remove a Load Bearing Wall | Ask This Old House



Tom Silva explains what load bearing walls are, how to identify them, and what needs to be done in order to safely remove them.

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Tom Silva explains how to identify load bearing walls and how to remove them. Load bearing walls are an issue for many renovators today, as more homeowners are opting for an open concept layout instead of individual rooms. Unfortunately, these walls can’t be ripped out haphazardly as load bearing walls play a vital role to the structure of a house. They distribute weight from the roof, through the floors, and down to the foundation. Tom shares tips on how to determine if a wall is load bearing or not. He suggests going down to the basement or attic to see which way the joists run. If the wall is parallel to the joists, it’s probably not load bearing. If the wall is perpendicular, it’s most likely load bearing. Tom then demonstrates two ways of removing these walls, the above-ceiling technique and the below-ceiling technique. These methods will prevent the floor above from sagging and can give you the open layout you desire.

Cost: $1,000 – $10,000
Skill Level: Expert

Steps:
1. Determine whether a wall is load bearing or not. Check an unfinished basement or attic to see which way the joists run.
a. If the wall runs parallel to the joists, it’s probably not load bearing.
b. If it’s perpendicular, it most likely is a load bearing wall
2. Start by adding temporary walls to either side of the wall being removed to hold up the weight while work is being done. Place the temporary walls close enough to the structural wall but far enough away to work on the structural wall.
3. Remove the load bearing wall.
4. Add posts to either side of the wall to accept a beam to redistribute the weight above. Place them over the weight bearing beam in the floor below.
5. Use one of the techniques Tom demonstrated in the segment: the below-ceiling technique and the above-ceiling technique. Both methods rely on redistributing the weight from the load bearing wall to the walls beside it by creating point loads.
6. In the above-ceiling technique, cut into the joists to allow a beam to be installed in between. The joists will be attached to the new beam and the beam will rest directly on the point loads, but be flush with the ceiling.
7. In the below-ceiling technique, cut the posts slightly shorter and have the joists above rest directly on top of the beam across. The beam will be exposed, but it will keep the floor flush above.
8. Removing a load bearing wall by yourself can result in a lot of costly mistakes. It is best to consult a licensed engineer prior to beginning work on the project.

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About Ask This Old House TV:
From the makers of This Old House, America’s first and most trusted home improvement show, Ask This Old House answers the steady stream of home improvement questions asked by viewers across the United States. Covering topics from landscaping to electrical to HVAC and plumbing to painting and more. Ask This Old House features the experts from This Old House, including general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape contractor Jenn Nawada, master carpenter Norm Abram, and host Kevin O’Connor. Ask This Old House helps you protect and preserve your greatest investment—your home.

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How to Identify and Remove a Load Bearing Wall | Ask This Old House
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